Thursday, March 23, 2017

#SOL17: Making Images

What the Lark Knows (M.A. Reilly, Ringwood, NJ, 11/23/2010)


Someone in Australia  just purchased "What The Lark Knows," an art print of mine. I most likely will never know who the art purchaser was and in a few weeks I will receive payment. Meanwhile the art buyer will receive in the mail an art print of an image I made late fall, just a few days after Rob's birthday, when Devon was in 6th grade.  It was a day when there was a glorious fog. Dev and I ended up playing hooky from work and school.

"You want to run around in the fog?" I asked my son early that morning on the way to school and work.
"Sure."
"We'll go out for breakfast after I make a few images." 

We headed to the grounds of the local botanical gardens and Devon would later pose for me and then run through a field as the sun , looking very much like the moon, burned through some of the fog. I was able to capture both moments as photographs (see below).

And then we went out to a local diner and had some breakfast.


The Uncertainty Principle (M.A. Reilly, Ringwood, NJ, 11/23/2010)
Coming through the Rye (M.A. Reilly, Ringwood, NJ, 11/23/2010)

Now and then, I think about the many ways that the Internet helps to connect people with one another and with work that gets shared. I think of this each time I get a notification from Red Bubble, the company that sells reproductions of my work. It's a bit of a kick to think that in a week or so an image I made in 2010 will be hanging on the wall of someone's home in Australia. What a glorious time to be alive.



12 comments:

  1. Love these pieces! What is your website?

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    1. Thank you. My work is shown in Red Bubble. http://www.redbubble.com/people/reilly58

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  2. I find your images hauntingly beautiful and engaging. You certainly have an "eye" for words and images - which in my mind must certainly emerge from the same section of the brain - and heart!

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    1. Anita, you are right about the heart. When I make images I feel the image well before I see it.

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  3. Only an artist would see that fog and make a plan to go out in it, play, and photograph. I love that you have the memory of it, and that your picture will hang on a stranger's wall far away. It'll be a little thought of you sent every time they look. My husband and I collected much art through the years, and I've kept some, let the rest go to my children. Our first watercolor hangs above my bed, an artist we met at an auction years ago. I do think of him when I look at the painting, and do a little thank you for the beauty he created. Thanks, Mary Ann. I'm glad you shared.

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    1. I have a house full of art-- a lot of my own and others Rob and I collected across the years. I like the idea of gifting to Devon what he would like on the day he gets his own place. Your mention of watercolors reminds me of the two images we purchased from an artist on The Isle of Sky in Scotland and the hours we spent chatting with the artist in his gallery. Good memories.

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  4. I agree with you about the internet and the power of linking us all up to share 'powerful slices' of our lives. I was also thinking about how your story is sold with the piece of art, but I am sure the image or memory will never leave you.

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    1. The images that foggy day in November will not leave me--or at least I hope not. A friend used the image, Coming through the Rye, as the cover of her most recent book. I like to think of the various places work I have made has ended up.

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  5. Magic moments created by seeking your heart's desire. I live on an island. We get lots of fog and it makes for the best images. I love these Mary Ann. Congratulations on the sale. I am sure that it will be enjoyed half way across the globe.-Barbara
    PS: First read of CS Lewis completed in one swallow. I began Bonanno. I love the balance they both offer read one after another. I am doing OK.

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    1. I would love to live on an island. The fog must be amazing. I would be in heaven! Glad you read the CS Lewis first. The work by Bonanno is more clinical, less heart and I agree the two balance. Of course you are doing Ok. Writing connecting, speaking your heart helps the most, yes?

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  6. Thanks for sharing a look behind your images. Your fog ones are hauntingly beautiful. They have the potential of carrying not only your story/memory but also the viewer's story. I say that because your images made me think of Chris Van Allsburg's two books -- The Mysteries of Harris Burdick and The Chronicles of Harris Burdick. Are you familiar with them?

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    1. I know both books and have used each with students who crafted their own stories from the title image, and line. His drawings are beautiful.

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